Cultivating Recruitment Science

Cultivating Recruitment Science

What research questions do we need to answer about recruitment?

To continue to enhance effectiveness of recruitment efforts and improve tools, research methods, and recruitment practices, it is critical that we build the evidence base for a "science of recruitment." This evidence base can build the case for proven recruitment techniques and guide future study design, recruitment plans, and decision-making.

Ideas in this area might address:

  • Identifying and characterizing target audiences
  • Developing and testing audience-specific strategies and tactics
  • Identifying gaps in knowledge about recruitment strategies and implementation
  • Evaluating recruitment strategy success
  • Developing a robust evidence base for recruitment strategies and a science of recruitment
(@natlefforts)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Develop an understanding of why people do and do not enroll and remain engaged in registries

Examine the motivators, barriers, and facilitators to enrolling and remaining in a registry until invited to be considered for a study. Identify methods that influence a registry enrollee to participate in a study, including an analysis of how participants’ cognitive and functional status, demographics and other variables influence their registry behavior.

Voting

7 votes
(@natlefforts)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Effectiveness of digital tools for raising awareness

Assess the use of social networks, crowd sourcing and other digital environments, like disease forums, that would facilitate “pre-recruitment” discussions about the state of the science related to Alzheimer’s, improving awareness and inspiring curiosity about registries or clinical studies.

Voting

8 votes
(@natlefforts)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Take inventory of current national registry efforts and identify strengths and weaknesses.

Assess the state of the field, with respect to current approaches, modalities, space, and performance. Look at registries in the context of their utility for recruitment to small studies as well as for large multi-site trials and national surveys. Identify best practices in recruiting and retaining registry volunteers for prolonged periods.

Voting

17 votes
(@nbour4)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

My dissertation: identifying multi-level factors affecting ADRD clinical trial enrollment

The goal of my dissertation is to identify the policy, system, organizational, and personal factors that facilitate, bar, and motivate ADRD community members to participate in clinical trials. My first stage is establishing a community advisory board comprised of ADRD professionals (clinicians, investigators/research assistants, and advocates) and people with ADRD and their care partners (including Black/African-American ...more »

Voting

3 votes
(@natlefforts)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Develop recruitability assessment measures

Develop a way to assess the recruitability of varying protocols. Such analyses could examine trial design, availability of infrastructure or off-site entities to support imaging and other off-site technologies and clinical specialties, and diversity/special population issues that could pose access-limiting challenges.

Voting

6 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Recruitment funnel

It strikes me that recruiting for trials is very similar to the process used to market any product or service. I really recommend engaging a strong marketing partner. It's all about the funnel. First, identifying the target market (who do we want to recruit), then determining how to best reach them. In order to get one person out the end of the funnel (meaning into a clinical study), how many need to be "interested" ...more »

Voting

11 votes
(@carmen2u)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Create an Online Compendium of Recruitment Best Practices

With each successful clinical study recruitment effort, the lessons learned should be added to a national list of best practices. The same goes for unsuccessful recruitment efforts in discovering what did not work and why. These best practices must be shared online in a way that is easily searchable (e.g. recruitment promotion, study materials, phone screening, etc.) so that study teams can create their plan using the ...more »

Voting

13 votes
(@sznpetrella)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

How to reach everyday subjects during the business of their day.

Just like we see in drug stores and some big box stores what about a chair with a touch screen? The participant sits down, accepts the terms, and begins the test. It could be a condensed set of questions that screen for early signs of cognitive decline with a score at the end. The constraints could regard age, or showing ID to a pharmacist first without having to enter identifying information in the "data chair". A ...more »

Voting

6 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Brain awareness from early to late

Preparing populations to better cope with brain disorders should begin at a young age. School curriculums world-wide need to be modified to include a spiral up awareness about the brain and its disorders. One cannot expect a 6 year to comprehend the same level as a 16-year-old, but this doesn’t mean that brain education cannot be presented to 6-year-olds. It is just needs to be structured to correspond to their level ...more »

Voting

1 vote
(@natlefforts)

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Apply behavioral mapping and behavior analysis

Apply formative research, including such techniques as behavioral mapping and behavioral analysis to identify major factors, including barriers and facilitators, to help determine the likelihood that people in a particular audience will engage in sought-after behaviors involved in participating in research.

Voting

6 votes