Cultivating Recruitment Science

Cultivating Recruitment Science

What research questions do we need to answer about recruitment?

To continue to enhance effectiveness of recruitment efforts and improve tools, research methods, and recruitment practices, it is critical that we build the evidence base for a "science of recruitment." This evidence base can build the case for proven recruitment techniques and guide future study design, recruitment plans, and decision-making.

Ideas in this area might address:

  • Identifying and characterizing target audiences
  • Developing and testing audience-specific strategies and tactics
  • Identifying gaps in knowledge about recruitment strategies and implementation
  • Evaluating recruitment strategy success
  • Developing a robust evidence base for recruitment strategies and a science of recruitment

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by

Brain awareness from early to late

Preparing populations to better cope with brain disorders should begin at a young age. School curriculums world-wide need to be modified to include a spiral up awareness about the brain and its disorders. One cannot expect a 6 year to comprehend the same level as a 16-year-old, but this doesn’t mean that brain education cannot be presented to 6-year-olds. It is just needs to be structured to correspond to their level ...more »

Voting

1 vote

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@nbour4)

My dissertation: identifying multi-level factors affecting ADRD clinical trial enrollment

The goal of my dissertation is to identify the policy, system, organizational, and personal factors that facilitate, bar, and motivate ADRD community members to participate in clinical trials. My first stage is establishing a community advisory board comprised of ADRD professionals (clinicians, investigators/research assistants, and advocates) and people with ADRD and their care partners (including Black/African-American ...more »

Voting

3 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@sznpetrella)

How to reach everyday subjects during the business of their day.

Just like we see in drug stores and some big box stores what about a chair with a touch screen? The participant sits down, accepts the terms, and begins the test. It could be a condensed set of questions that screen for early signs of cognitive decline with a score at the end. The constraints could regard age, or showing ID to a pharmacist first without having to enter identifying information in the "data chair". A ...more »

Voting

6 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by

Recruitment funnel

It strikes me that recruiting for trials is very similar to the process used to market any product or service. I really recommend engaging a strong marketing partner. It's all about the funnel. First, identifying the target market (who do we want to recruit), then determining how to best reach them. In order to get one person out the end of the funnel (meaning into a clinical study), how many need to be "interested" ...more »

Voting

11 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by

Alzheimer's Research in Action

Many people have no clue what it means to participate in a research study. As we age, we learn by doing. The best way to get buy in from the community is to walk them through the stages of actual research. A small group would be terecruited to move through the different phases of the proposed research in an open forum.

Voting

6 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@memories1)

Follow the Money

Specific target participants have something in common - I think about the largest unviverse of subjects will be related to where the get their money or what they spend their money on. For example many may access the same financial support system such as SS Disability, some may take the same medication,. What they have in comon can drive where the study will look for participants. There are intelligence target marketing ...more »

Voting

4 votes