Cultivating Recruitment Science

Cultivating Recruitment Science

What research questions do we need to answer about recruitment?

To continue to enhance effectiveness of recruitment efforts and improve tools, research methods, and recruitment practices, it is critical that we build the evidence base for a "science of recruitment." This evidence base can build the case for proven recruitment techniques and guide future study design, recruitment plans, and decision-making.

Ideas in this area might address:

  • Identifying and characterizing target audiences
  • Developing and testing audience-specific strategies and tactics
  • Identifying gaps in knowledge about recruitment strategies and implementation
  • Evaluating recruitment strategy success
  • Developing a robust evidence base for recruitment strategies and a science of recruitment

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Identify key audiences instrumental to a national strategy to improve participation in Alzheimer’s research

1) Identify target audiences for messaging and incentives related to recruitment to clinical trials and long-term natural history studies. This includes primary audiences of potential participants, as well as secondary groups and influencers, such as caregivers and clinicians, who can support recruitment and retention. 2) Determine each target audience’s current knowledge and predispositions regarding participation in ...more »

Voting

16 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Apply behavioral mapping and behavior analysis

Apply formative research, including such techniques as behavioral mapping and behavioral analysis to identify major factors, including barriers and facilitators, to help determine the likelihood that people in a particular audience will engage in sought-after behaviors involved in participating in research.

Voting

6 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Address and study beliefs, attitudes and other social norms, as well as incentives and disincentives to research participation

Steps: 1) Identify salient beliefs, attitudes, values, and perceived behavioral norms and/or incentives (monetary and non-monetary) likely to affect whether people in various audiences are motivated – or not -- to join in research. 2) Articulate major barriers to participation in dementia research in each audience segment, especially among underrepresented groups. 3) Find out what key influencers, such as disease advocates, ...more »

Voting

20 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Test effectiveness of messaging and incentives

Test, whenever possible, the effectiveness of messaging and incentives for participation for varying audiences (patients, study partners and clinicians, specifically) and study types (e.g. dementia vs. prevention trials). Evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of different strategies on motivation and action toward research participation.

Voting

9 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Take inventory of current national registry efforts and identify strengths and weaknesses.

Assess the state of the field, with respect to current approaches, modalities, space, and performance. Look at registries in the context of their utility for recruitment to small studies as well as for large multi-site trials and national surveys. Identify best practices in recruiting and retaining registry volunteers for prolonged periods.

Voting

17 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Effectiveness of digital tools for raising awareness

Assess the use of social networks, crowd sourcing and other digital environments, like disease forums, that would facilitate “pre-recruitment” discussions about the state of the science related to Alzheimer’s, improving awareness and inspiring curiosity about registries or clinical studies.

Voting

8 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Develop an understanding of why people do and do not enroll and remain engaged in registries

Examine the motivators, barriers, and facilitators to enrolling and remaining in a registry until invited to be considered for a study. Identify methods that influence a registry enrollee to participate in a study, including an analysis of how participants’ cognitive and functional status, demographics and other variables influence their registry behavior.

Voting

7 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Develop simulation models of recruitment

Examine the development of a computer-based simulation laboratory that could model behaviors of potential research participants, study partners, clinicians, researchers, community based supports and others, so that virtual studies could be conducted to gain insights into the potential efficacy of proposed recruitment strategies.

Voting

4 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Develop recruitability assessment measures

Develop a way to assess the recruitability of varying protocols. Such analyses could examine trial design, availability of infrastructure or off-site entities to support imaging and other off-site technologies and clinical specialties, and diversity/special population issues that could pose access-limiting challenges.

Voting

6 votes