Cultivating Recruitment Science

Cultivating Recruitment Science

What research questions do we need to answer about recruitment?

To continue to enhance effectiveness of recruitment efforts and improve tools, research methods, and recruitment practices, it is critical that we build the evidence base for a "science of recruitment." This evidence base can build the case for proven recruitment techniques and guide future study design, recruitment plans, and decision-making.

Ideas in this area might address:

  • Identifying and characterizing target audiences
  • Developing and testing audience-specific strategies and tactics
  • Identifying gaps in knowledge about recruitment strategies and implementation
  • Evaluating recruitment strategy success
  • Developing a robust evidence base for recruitment strategies and a science of recruitment

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@capacitygrp)

Test models of moving research to community settings

Test models that move clinical research from the site to the community to lower barriers for volunteering. Consider use of mobile units, home or other residential settings, online assessments, satellite offices, and telemedicine, and seek flexibility from the study sponsors or health authorities.

Voting

45 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Address and study beliefs, attitudes and other social norms, as well as incentives and disincentives to research participation

Steps: 1) Identify salient beliefs, attitudes, values, and perceived behavioral norms and/or incentives (monetary and non-monetary) likely to affect whether people in various audiences are motivated – or not -- to join in research. 2) Articulate major barriers to participation in dementia research in each audience segment, especially among underrepresented groups. 3) Find out what key influencers, such as disease advocates, ...more »

Voting

20 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Take inventory of current national registry efforts and identify strengths and weaknesses.

Assess the state of the field, with respect to current approaches, modalities, space, and performance. Look at registries in the context of their utility for recruitment to small studies as well as for large multi-site trials and national surveys. Identify best practices in recruiting and retaining registry volunteers for prolonged periods.

Voting

17 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Identify key audiences instrumental to a national strategy to improve participation in Alzheimer’s research

1) Identify target audiences for messaging and incentives related to recruitment to clinical trials and long-term natural history studies. This includes primary audiences of potential participants, as well as secondary groups and influencers, such as caregivers and clinicians, who can support recruitment and retention. 2) Determine each target audience’s current knowledge and predispositions regarding participation in ...more »

Voting

16 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@carmen2u)

Create an Online Compendium of Recruitment Best Practices

With each successful clinical study recruitment effort, the lessons learned should be added to a national list of best practices. The same goes for unsuccessful recruitment efforts in discovering what did not work and why. These best practices must be shared online in a way that is easily searchable (e.g. recruitment promotion, study materials, phone screening, etc.) so that study teams can create their plan using the ...more »

Voting

13 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by

Recruitment funnel

It strikes me that recruiting for trials is very similar to the process used to market any product or service. I really recommend engaging a strong marketing partner. It's all about the funnel. First, identifying the target market (who do we want to recruit), then determining how to best reach them. In order to get one person out the end of the funnel (meaning into a clinical study), how many need to be "interested" ...more »

Voting

11 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Test effectiveness of messaging and incentives

Test, whenever possible, the effectiveness of messaging and incentives for participation for varying audiences (patients, study partners and clinicians, specifically) and study types (e.g. dementia vs. prevention trials). Evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of different strategies on motivation and action toward research participation.

Voting

9 votes

Cultivating Recruitment Science

Submitted by (@natlefforts)

Effectiveness of digital tools for raising awareness

Assess the use of social networks, crowd sourcing and other digital environments, like disease forums, that would facilitate “pre-recruitment” discussions about the state of the science related to Alzheimer’s, improving awareness and inspiring curiosity about registries or clinical studies.

Voting

8 votes